Dura Metastasis: Hepatocellular Carcinoma

The most common tumors found in the central nervous system and dura (i.e. the dense fibrous covering that envelops the brain) are those that have traveled from other body sites in a process called metastasis.  Depicted here is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a cancer of liver cells, that has metastasized to the dura overlying the anterior pole of the right frontal lobe. Microscopically, the neoplastic liver... Continue Reading →

Malignant Meningitis

The brain is surrounded by several layers of protective coverings collectively called meninges.  The semi-translucent innermost layers, called the leptomeninges, form a "shrink-wrap" around the brain that allows for easy flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) along the outer surface of central nervous system structures. Unfortunately, it also allows for easy spread of neoplastic cells.  The image shows the inferior aspect... Continue Reading →

Renal Cell Carcinoma Embolized with PVA

Renal cell carcinoma, a relatively common cancer of the kidney, is a highly vascular lesion that will typically bleed extensively during surgery.  Just prior to surgery this  renal cell carcinoma that had metastasized to the paraspinal soft tissue was embolized using PVA (polyvinyl alcohol), the blue foreign embolic material within the vessel lumen.  This process of embolization was... Continue Reading →

Metastatic Cancers

Metastatic cancers (i.e. cancers that originate somewhere else and travel to the brain usually via the bloodstream) can occur singly or, as pictured here, as multiple lesions.  Sometimes brain metastases represent the initial clue that the person has cancer somewhere else in the body, as was the case for this patient who was found to have three enhancing cerebral lesions... Continue Reading →

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